Weed the People (2018): review


Weed the People (2018): review

Weed The People is a documentary by Abby Epstein that explores the topic of treating cancer with medical marijuana. The film primarily focuses on the struggles of sick children and their parents. It documents their progress and makes a convincing case for the use of cannabis oil as a cancer treatment.

The results of the cannabis treatment border on miraculous and raise questions around its limited use. Throughout the movie, Epstein develops and communicates a message of hope. Hope that patients can overcome their suffering with medical marijuana, and hope that cannabis will be taken seriously by more doctors and researchers.

THE GOOD

Weed The People provides viewers with a very informative take on the current state of medical marijuana in the US. A significant chunk of the documentary is dedicated to exploring the lack of research surrounding the medical uses of marijuana and the federal government’s lack of support for cannabis as a medical treatment. Despite anecdotal evidence supporting the obvious medical benefits of marijuana, cannabis is still classed as a Schedule 1 drug.

Weed The People does a great job of demonstrating that the problem lies directly with the US government, and the pharmaceutical industry. Throughout the film, numerous medical professionals share their frustrations with the lack of support for medical marijuana.

Epstein’s film is an inspiring one. It elicits hope and optimism for the future of medical marijuana, cancer treatments, and cancer patients. The film does a great job of demonstrating how people can overcome personal biases when faced with personal struggles. Additionally, by exploring the characters and motivations of health-oriented cannabis producers, it inspires hope in resistance. Epstein demonstrates how people can change, and how they can come together for a positive purpose.

THE BAD

THE BAD

Epstein’s movie does not fully explore the issue of prohibition when it comes to medical marijuana. While heartwarming, the child-centric narrative of the film is somewhat emotionally manipulative. The film simply does not give a voice to the opponents of medical marijuana. This became especially clear when one of the parents obtained cannabis oil containing rubbing alcohol. The possibility of a tainted product is merely one risk of dosing with cannabis oils that is not fully explored.

Moreover, the film does not explore the financial side of medical marijuana. Topics like “cannapreneurs” and resistance to legalization are so complex that they could have their own documentaries.

THE BOTTOM LINE

Abby Epstein’s documentary is very informative and educational, however, it could have been even more so. The movie is emotionally stimulating and captivates audiences with its heartwarming and optimistic storylines.

Despite its intentional bias, the film raises some very good questions about the state of marijuana research, and who is responsible for it. Moreover, it accurately implicates the federal government and the pharmaceutical industry in the avoidance and rejection of marijuana as a legitimate medical treatment.

Weed The People is definitely worth your time. If you are interested in medical marijuana and the politics that govern it, make sure to check it out!